The Principle Of Retinal And Iris Scanning Technology

Fingerprint method can be misapplied. This reality is proven scientifically correct. For that reason, people then try to find the more reliable biometric systems.

The retina is part of the eyes that is responsible for the ability to see. The pattern of blood vessels that forms the retina is as unique as fingerprint. The principle of retinal scanning technology is scanning the pattern of capillary blood vessels on the retina with low-intensity light sources.

In 1987, the first retinal scanner was made by Leonard Flom and Aram Safir and has been patented. However, by the year 1994, John Daugman developed the technology of iris scanning as a competitor for retinal scanner.

Retinal scanning principle

Retinal scanning is based on the fine capillary network that meets the needs of oxygen and nutrients to the retina. These blood vessels absorb light and can easily be visualized with appropriate lighting. To that end, the close distance between the eyes and a scanner is needed. The appropriate position of eyes toward the scanner is also necessary. Also, there must be no eye movement, such as blink or glance.

Retinal scanning can not be 100 percent accurate. It is also less suitable as a security tool because even though the pattern of capillary blood vessels of human beings’ retinas cannot change generally, but diabetes, glaucoma, and cataracts can change it.

Iris scanning

In its development, retinal scanning is considered to be too disruptive in the case of security detection devices. In the use of retinal scanning, the eyes should be as close as possible with the scanner. For long-term, the light of scanner that is too close to the eye can give negative effects.

Because of the weakness, iris scanning technology emerges as strong competitor. Iris, a network that gives color to the eyes is also unique in which the chance for two identical slices is 1:1,078. Even, the left iris and right iris of someone are different.